Bend Insensitive Fiber–A Perfect Solution For FTTH

It’s known that almost all fiber optic cables have one common weakness when deploying FTTH (Fiber to the Home): attenuation. Any accidentally twisting or bending of cable too much will generate attenuation that can ruin your application with signal loss. If the damage is severe, the user is usually faced with an option: either dump it or buy a new one. In order to solve the problem, bend insensitive fiber is designed to cause much lower optical power loss under bend conditions. In this way, cable bending won’t be an obstacle for your cable installation.

bend sensitive fiber cables

What is Bend Insensitive Fiber?

Bend insensitive fibers can produce minimum loss while transmitting light even if they are bent beyond the bend radius. In bend insensitive fibers, an optical trench is built with a lower refractive index material around the core so that the lost light can be reflected back in, thus minimizing data loss. At the same time, other factors like core diameter, wavelengths, single mode or multimode, etc are also optimized to minimize the losses due to excessive fiber cable bends during installation or maintenance.

Advantages of Bend Insensitive Fiber
  • Fiber cable installation errors due to steep cable bends (inside patch panels, racks, entrance/exit points, etc) can be avoided.
  • Bend insensitive fiber cables are very useful for indoor fiber cable installations as they can now be taken around walls, pillars, ceilings, ducts, and other uneven surfaces within the buildings.
  • Higher bandwidth applications can be confidently deployed using bend insensitive fibers as accidental excessive bending of fibers does not cause much of performance degradation.
  • Bend insensitive fibers also show a great deal of resilience in situations where fibers are fixed to surfaces using clamping, tie-wrapping or stapling.
  • Bend insensitive fibers can be spliced with the same methods used for normal cables, and in most cases, the normal fiber connectors and accessories are compatible to be used with bend insensitive fibers.

BIF cable for ftth

Why Choose Bend Insensitive Fiber For FTTH?

With the continuous demand of higher bandwidth, copper cables are reaching their limit to do the job. FTTH (Fiber to the Home) networks are expected to replace the copper networks with bend insensitive fibers. The bend insensitive cable has less attenuation compared with traditional fiber cables and this will make the installation and maintenance of the fiber optic cables more efficient.

In FTTH networks, people require the fiber optic cables to be bend-insensitive so that it is easier to deploy in the house, such as at the angled points inside the rooms along the walls. Another benefit we can get from bend insensitive fiber cables is that they are space saving. This is also the trend of future fiber optic network—smaller, denser and more efficient. Many companies such as FS.COM are able to provide the bend insensitive fiber optic cables compliant to ITU-T G657 standards.

Conclusion

Bend insensitive fibers can keep lower power loss under bend conditions. This kind of cable is quite necessary to the application of FTTH (Fiber to the Home) access network. FS.COM bend insensitive fiber patch cables are available for multimode (OM2, OM3 and OM4) and single-mode (OS2) networks. Each bend insensitive cable is manufactured with high-quality components and is thoroughly hand-tested for optimum optical performance. For more information, please contact us at sales@fs.com.

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ting11

I work in the marketing department in Fiberstore. Fiberstore company is a professional manufacturer & supplier of fiber optic cabling products. As the best OEM fiber optic cable manufacturer, Fiberstore provides a wide range of optical fiber cables with detailed specifications displayed for your convenient selecting. Per foot price of each fiber cable is flexible depending on the quantities of your order. All of our fiber cables come with a lifetime advance replacement warranty and are 100% functionally tested.